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20130201
20130228
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KQED (PBS) 42
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English 42
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
pushing up fuel prices. those higher prices come as gasoline is also on the rise. joining us now with the outlook for energy, alan harry. he's portfolio manager and c.e.o. of the spartan commodity fund. alan, let me first start off by talking to you about home heating oil. we saw prices up this week 3%. what is the trend going forward? >> well, thank you for having me. what i look at right now is short term we're going up a little bit more. longer term we're heading down. two, three weeks we're going to go up just a little bit more. after that, down we go. >> susie: why is that? >> well, i think we're coming to the close of the heating season. we already have an idea of what days we have left of heating. and it's not using up enough. so they've kept a lot in reserve, a lot of speculation coming to the market, and it's not getting used up. two, three weeks we have a great idea of where we will sit heating season wise. after that, down we go displuz for most of the u.s., households use natural gas. they don't use heating oil. and the ones that do are mostly in the northeast. so com
. >> it is because television. >> hold it eleanor. >> the spectacle has lost a lot of the drama and dignity it used to have. he walks down that aisle and gets slaps and high fives. they should have had beyonce doing her number midway through it. >> every other president has walked down that aisle and i don't recall you complaining about it. >> it has lost dignity. >> ike and fdr didn't look like that. >> it is an american tradition and the fact the numbers were down is partly because people don't watch television like they used to. >> eleanor, how were obama's kneels son ratings -- neilsen ratings, the second lowest since they began taking measurement in 1993. the lowest since 2000 when bill you clinton's last drew an audience of 931.5 million. >> i think neilsen should start rating some of the social media sites and look at the exchanges between people who watched it. the american people who watched that and pick up portions that have, here our president is addressing concerns in their lives. i agree the big topics like the eu trade pac that is very important. but i don't think people in the count
-qaeda rebels that the u.s. doesn't support. i don't want to see them at the top of the heap. >> rose: that's always the answer to the question people always ask. suppose you win what then. >> it's a good question. right now they're not winning. right now you have a situation where assad is pretty entrenched and the rebels are making gammons -- games but they don't seem to be decisive yet. >> rose: able to close the deal. >> not yet. so you're looking at a fairly drawn out conflict. one of the concerns people have is if the conflict is drawn out much longer, there won't be much left to hand over to oppose the assad regime. the whole mechanism and institutions of the state will have been destroyed. >> rose: let me make sure i understand. i have your piece in front of me and i read it several times. you are reporting from people within the whitehouse they're beginning to consider as a condition deteriorates reopening that debate. is that the extent of what you're saying. >> the way i would put it is they haven't ruled it out and down the road they may reconsider it. and really the emphasis
york. >> susie: even though those retail numbers are a positive sign for the u.s. economy. investors were worried about some not so good signals today about europe's economy. stocks turned negative on comments from europe's central bank president saying the strong euro could dampen europe's recovery. here on wall street, the dow fell 42 points, the nasdaq lost three and the s&p slipped over two points. >> tom: still ahead, douglas burtnick joins us, he's with aberdeen asset management. >> susie: a battle is brewing between a big name hedge fund investor and apple. at issue: how to get apple to unlock value for shareholders. today david einhorn of greenlight capital sued apple to block a move that would stop the use of preferred shares. shareholders will vote on this at apple's annual meeting on february 27. what einhorn is proposing is that apple pay out more of its cash hoard to investors, using a special kind of preferred stock. einhorn has a lot at stake: his fund owns more than one million shares of apple, and while the stock rose a bit today, it's down 35% since its peak of $700
. >> reporter: with earnings season winding down, wall street could use some new headlines to chew on. good economic data would be nice. friendly washington politics would also be helpful. tonight's state of the union speech might give investors a clue as to whether that's likely to happen. veteran trader teddy weissberg is hoping president obama will stress the need for bipartisanship but isn't sure that's what he'll hear. >> in terms of tonight, i don't think anybody that i talk to in the wall street arena expects to hear anything terribly dramatic one way or another. >> reporter: since lawmakers and the white house kicked the proverbial can down the road around new years, the stock market has rallied rather nicely. the s&p 500 is up nearly 7% and the dow is about 150 points away from its all-time high. of course, stocks have been getting help from corporate america, too. it turns out fourth quarter profits were better than expected, led by the housing sector and financial firms. >> about 345 companies have reported so far, of which 70% have beaten earnings expectations and 66% have beate
: a leaked document today put the spotlight back on lethal strikes by the u.s. government on u.s. citizens abroad. in response, top officials in the obama administration argued their actions are justified and legal. >> primary concern is to keep the american people safe, now do so in a way that's consistent with our laws and our values. >> ifill: attorney general eric holder today defended the justice department's rationale for authorizing the killings of americans overseas. >> we are -- we have as a basis for action that we take a congressional statute that allows us to operate against al qaeda and associated entities not only in pakistan or not only in afghanistan but in other parts of the world. we say that we only take these kinds of actions when there's an imminent threat, when capture is not feasible and when we are confident that we're doing so in a they's consistent with a federal international law. >> ifill: nbc news obtained a 16-page justice department white paper apparently prepared for congressional committees last summer that describes the obama administration's legal reasoni
gets under way. andrew harding was in court again for us today. tried to maskrius his feelings in court today, ploys to discover if he would be released from police custody. the magistrate took two hours to summarize the twists of this dramatic case. still no cameras allowed when the court was in session. >> i've come to the conclusion that the accused has made a case to be released on bail. toas the magistrates began announce his decision, oscar pistorius slumped, sobbing, his shoulders shaking. his father tried to comfort him. the athlete stood up and left court. there was more relief here today, everybody knows there is a long legal journey ahead. as a sign of that, at the magistrate imposed strict conditions on the athlete. bayless 70,000 pounds, he must remain in south africa and report to the police twice a week. the magistrate said he found aspects of the testimony troubling. what really happened that night when he rushed from his bedroom to shoot four times to a toilet girl killing his girlfriend reeva steenkamp? >> there are some aspects of the version of the accused that are q
is that if you look at the next ten years, most of it will be caused by things we care about. >> all of us are invested in this democracy. we are to the going to have parts of our community succeed and parts fail. if government fails, we all fail. >> we don't trust government. but we need government. and government is us, when you come right down to it. those folks in washington weren't landed there from mars. they were elected by us. >> it's a complex problem. people want quick answersment but the fact is that there aren't quick answers. >> these aren't things that can be fixed in election cycle. and the question is do we have the political leadership that is willing to invest that way. >> rational thinking leads to one thing, conclusions. and conclusions are not going to solve the debt problem. emotions on the other hand leads to another thing, action. okay. and we need to take action about the debt in the u.s. we need to change. >> we're going to pass on to our kids a less prosperous nation where they will have a lower standard of living, a massive debt they can't afford to pay off and
. there are some wonderful sportsmen and sports women. one more item from the world of sports but the u.s. government has joined a lawsuit against lance armstrong after talks with his lawyers broke down. the suit argues armstrong defrauded the american public by insisting he was not using drugs will writing for the u.s. postal service team. last month, he admitted using performance enhancing drugs. this weekend, italian voters must decide do they trust to get their ailing country moving again. the choice includes a former communist an outspoken comedian, berlusconi, and economic technocrat mario monti. our europe editor has more. naples in the final hours of campaigning in the italian general election but europe fears the result could cause tremors any euro zone. an ex-orites to win is communist. away from the public rallies, he had this message for europe. >> i intend to convince your of the that austerity is not enough. i do not believe european policies are correct. they need to be adjusted to take more account of investment and jobs. >> he promises to reduce the deficit any sense the
moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the federal government moved another day closer today to $85 billion in automatic spending cuts. and as political charges and counter-charges flew, federal reserve chief ben bernanke raised new fears about the potential economic fallout. the fed chairman told a senate committee that forcing across-the-board spending cuts could slice half a percentage point off economic growth. >> i think an appropriate balance would be to introduce these cuts more gradually and to compensate with larger and more sustained cuts in the longer run to address our long-run fiscal issues. >> ifill: bernanke said the sequester was supposed to be a doomsday weapon
for the second time the popular lecture that is on this dvd, "capitalism hits the fan." tell us why you say capitalism has hit the fan. >> well, the classic defense of capitalism as a system for much of its history has been, okay, it has this or that flaw. but it "delivers the goods." >> yeah, for most everybody. >> right. >> that was the argument. >> and so you may not get the most, but it'll trickle down to you, all the different ways. >> the yachts will rise. >> that's right. the ocean will lift all the boats. the reality is that for at least 30 years now, that isn't true. for the majority of people, capitalism is not delivering the goods. it is delivering, arguably, the bads. and so we have this disparity getting wider and wider between those for whom capitalism continues to deliver the goods by all means, but a growing majority in this society which isn't getting the benefit, is in fact, facing harder and harder times. and that's what provokes some of us to begin to say, "it's a systemic problem." >> so we put together some recent headlines. the merger of american and us air, giving us
as the rest of the market-- including u.s. government officials who in 2007 publicly stated that problems in the subprime market appeared to be contained." >> reporter: s&p goes on to argue that the securities at issue in the justice department's case were reviewed by another ratings agency and received the same rating. s&p says it also began downgrading many mortgage securities in 2006, warning that conditions in the housing market were deteriorating. but critics say what matters is what s&p claimed at the time it stamped securities triple a. >> the ratings agencies claim that they have unique analytic abilities and very sophisticated models that enable them to determine the credit worthiness of a bond, a derivative, a security. >> reporter: s&p points out court rulings have dismissed what it called challenges to a credit rating made with 20/20 hindsight. if the justice department does sue, standard and poor's says it will vigorously defend itself. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: still ahead, tonight's word on the street: consumers, the street.com's david peltier joins us wit
by the news. >> you are joking. the pope? oh, my god. >> i'm so shocked. he has been such a short time with us. >> joseph was born into a catholic family in germany and was forced into the hitler youth. he was brought up as a theologian. he became more conservative in the 1960's. it was as a traditionalist that he became the doctrinal watchdog for john paul ii. the people who met the pope said that he was shy and charming. his most important writings dealt with things such as the importance of love. >> he is the most intelligent, intelligent,pope we have had in years. his sermons and harmonies are beautiful. >> he warned that excluding christianity from national debate could be harmful for democracy. by the time pope benedict came to westminster cathedral, he renewed respect for his argument that religion should stay at the heart of public life. over the last few years, catholicism has grown in the developing world. in its birthplace of europe, he has found the tides of secularism, all but impossible to stem. the pope defended moslems by quoting historical criticisms of it is lomb. -- islam. h
to their morale and would be a major boost to us as well as giving a great military who assets. >> civilians pay the highest price for this ambition. a battle for their future that makes refugees of their own people. we sped south. an army has been trying to advance to protect the airport. the rebels have moved in to stop it. the ground there is witness to the brutality of the fight. new -- bares witness to the brutality of the fight. the flag lets everyone know who is leading the resistance. we saw four and fighters from libya, iraq, and saudi arabia. they seem to dominate the front lines. they have a reputation for being tough, disciplined, and braves. some fear they want to hardline islamic states, far removed from what began as a call for freedom and democracy. without help from elsewhere, many are glad of their support. there is another reason to worry about what is happening here. only a few kilometers away is the vast military complex, believed by some to use your part of this suspect in and chemical weapon stocks. this town has been pounded relentlessly in a fight that resonates far beyo
is starting to return. >> reporter: sure, the u.s. economy may be outperforming most other developed nations. but some investment strategists see good opportunities in the weakest parts the world like europe. >> although growth is still negative, we do believe that this year will be that tipping point where growth returns positive. and things are getting progressively just a little less bad. >> reporter: he recommends buying the stocks of big european companies that get much of their revenues outside the region. >> you've got a lot of companies based in these countries which sell to the emerging markets and that growing consumer within the emerging markets. i think you're seeing a lot of >> reporter: but others have a country specific approach. wells fargo advisors has norway as a top pick. >> not only is it a country with relatively low debt and a good credit standing, but it's also a country that's the 15th largest oil exporter in the world. and we think oil prices will continue to edge higher here. >> reporter: but, remember, even if you just buy stocks of big american companies, you like
balloon crash. they said they had turned things around, but now people will not believe them. us from luxor.or thanks so much. >> financial markets responded badly today to the political vacuum in italy. there are still no results from the weekend's election. and whichever one is the winner, it is likely to be too weak to lead. the party that got the most votes refuses to take part to form a coalition government. correct emergency meetings were held at the italian prime minister's office -- >> the emergency meetings were held up the italian prime minister's office today after the election deadlock. there was right at the prospect of political instability. after a night of waiting, it became apparent that neither the center left nor the center- right could form a stable government. it was 24 hours after the polls closed that the leaders of the center-left, pier luigi pazzani -- bersani, came out to face a dramatic situation. the problem, he said, with the remedy we came up with for the financial crisis. it was based on just austerity and rigor, and had a deep impact on public opinion.
and risk to the marketplace. >> reporter: although the u.s. economic recovery stalled out at the end of last year, there's hope for a rebound this year. at the same time economic data from china and europe has been improving, all of which could boost global energy demand. triple-a predicts prices at the pump will keep climbing, topping out somewhere between $3.60 and $3.80 a gallon this spring. but traders say if you want a quick way to know where prices are headed, watch the stock market: >> oil prices look at equity market as a proxy for demand, or future demand. we are at 14,000 in the dow, no coincidence that we are at the highs of the energy market as well. >> reporter: and the higher price of gasoline comes as workers have less take-home pay, because of the expiration of a payroll tax holiday. so will consumers be forced to cut back spending, hurting economic growth, and stock market performance? >> not necessarily, because rising gasoline prices is usually predicated on a weaker dollar or better economic activity. better economic activity would lead to higher earnings. >> repo
provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: the world witnessed something today it had not seen since the 15th century: a sitting pope, benedict xvi, announced he is giving up the papacy. the news reverberated around the globe and stunned many of the world's 1.2 billion catholics. >> it was a big surprise because this doesn't happen all the time. and my first reaction was to pray and to call my friends, texted my friends and asked even my non-catholic and nonbelieving friends to keep us in their thoughts and in their prayers. >> i had never heard anything like this in my life. the pope has to be there until he dies. and he is resigning? >> popes can't resign. this
doing to them. >> rose: as you remember from the balkans, people used to say that history would judge the world's outside powers badly if they did not do something. that there was a moral imperative. is this similar? >> i feel that way. i think -- the question is what, however. and i do think that the international powers are doing quite a lot in terms of humanitarian assistance. the united states, for instance, has provided something like $50 million in humanitarian assistance. has been supporting the various groups to unite and give them -- recognize them, frankly. and then also try to be helpful in finding some kind of a diplomatic solution to this. i think the real issue comes down to what kind of military action and not every place is amenable to having some kind of military action. >> rose: is syria? >> in syria i think that we have to keep examining trying to figure out what can be done. i think it's hard, charlie, i really do. >> rose: secretary of state clinton, who you worked with, panetta petraeus, all recommended we do something. and the president said no, and you say the
of the right of girls to be educated. >> she said god has given her a second life and she will use it well. >> what an extraordinary young woman. as she continues to recover, today the taliban are the focus of talks in london between the leaders of pakistan and afghanistan. the goal is to create a more stable environment for when nato forces leave afghanistan in 2014. the mission is to get the taliban to negotiate peace, but what are the chances? >> 12 years into a war that has cost 440 british lives, the prime minister invited the leaders of both afghanistan and pakistan to talk about the threats facing them all. >> the united kingdom will continue to stand firmly behind both countries as they work together to bring peace and stability to the region. finally, the progress we have achieved today sends a very clear message to the taliban. now is the time for everyone to participate in a peaceful political process in afghanistan. >> as british troops prepared to withdraw from afghanistan and handoff to afghan forces, intense combat like this is rare now. the military believe they have done t
lincoln has asked us to work with him to accomplish the death of slavery. >> no one's ever been loved is so much by the people. don't waste that power. >> this fight is for the united states of america. >> de choose to be born or are we fitted to the times we're born into. >> well, i done know about myself, you, maybe. >> this set els the fate for all coming times. not only the millions now in bondage, but of unborn millions to come. shall we stop this bleeding? >> i am pleased to have tony kushner back at this table. what does adapted screenplay mean. because there's a lot more here than doris's book. >> yeah, i mean the book in 2000 before doris had actually finished it and it was the book that steven asked me to adapt, i read it eagerly and i love it. i think it's a masterpiece. but team of rivals is a 900 page four-way political biography, the living definition of something that isn't going to make a feature length film. and steven i think knew that when he was getting chapter by chapter. so i think that when we say that it was adapted from team of rivals what we mean and i think
. >> exactly. and if you compare us to other countries, we spend the price for prescription drugs in the united states is 50% higher. as a general matter we spend much, much, much, much, more per capita for health care than any developed country. that's the bad news. the worst news is our results are terrible. in that sense-- . >> rose: so we're paying more and getting less. >> in that sense it is a bit like the book i wrote about education. which is we spend more on education, the as a results are not as good. here we spend much, much more on health care and the results-- are not good. >> rose: tell me about this concept of charge masters. >> this is the thing, you know, among the categories of things that affect all of our lives that we never knew about, this would be high on the list. every hospital has this giant list, six, seven, 8,000 items called the charge master. again it's all sort of in code and acronyms but if a nurse gives you a cup to take a pill, the cup is listed in the charge master. the cup, the little paper cup might be $6 it if you get a chest x-ray that something else in th
saying the substitution makes us not rivals for power but partners for progress. you agenda he made few concessions to republicans. it remans to be seen whether the president can break away from the bitter partisanship and dysfunction of his first term and whether he can strike the grand bargains the country needs. >> the greatest nation on worth cannot keep conducting its business by drifting from one manufactured crises to the next we can't do it. [applause] let's agree, let's agree right here right now to keep the people's government open and pay our bills on time and always uphold the full faith and credit of the united states of america. our economy is stronger. when we honor else the talents and ingenuity of striving hopeful immigrants. and right now, leaders from the business labor law enforcement faith communities, they all agree that the time has come to pass comprehensive immigration reform. now is the time to do it. know is the time to get it done. if you want to vote no, that's your choice. but these proposals deserve a vote. graduations, anniversaries have been stolen from
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)